Lexie reblogs stuff

Landscape/Environment Tut

badasserywoman:

Okay so i got a few notes on how i go about Environments/Landscapes…so i’ll share a method thats easy to work with….bare with me its been a little while since ive drawn them Lol

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First thing you want to start of with in your gradient background…use what ever is your preference. Depends on the setting, ima do some type of desert/dusty place.

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You’ll learn that the Lasso tool is gonna be your bae when it comes to environments…that and its pretty useful. Now your going to be working in three tones, 1.Dark 2.Mid 3.Light and it will always be the darkest at the front fading to light towards the back…make sense? So you will have three layers for each one to make your life easier and Lock those layers so you will only color within that area. Make sure the dark layer is on top. 

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Here is where the fun kicks in…we add our dets, try to stay with each tone and dont end up making it all muddy so you cant distinguish each one. Now you can go about this any way you please, you can paint it all in with one brush ( for some reason people get anal about shit like that, thinking there great for using one brush…i think if you got tools use em if you know how to do it right.) Or you can use custom brushes…since this is a tut ill mostly use custom brushes to slap stuff around. Its up to you really, also use the lasso tool like i said its your bae.

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The lasso can help define things better for you, so i wanted to add a structure type on the third layer. If you want to give an effect that the selection ive made is in front of the background right click your selection and invert it, add some lighting around the edges…only a little though you dont want to over do it.

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Also if you’ve done something on a layer you dont want to mess up or paint on what you can do is create a clipping mask on that layer. Its kinda like locking the layer to that one so you dont go outside of the layer or ruin what you worked on. Make a new layer above the one you wish to attach it to and right click the newlayer, a menu will pop up, your looking for clipping mask. Once you clicked it the layer should look like what ive circled. 

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Once your done working on each layer we are gonna put in some mist effect, this is something that helps separate each section. So make a new layer between each of your three as shown in the image. Like i said you can use what ever method you like, i just use a soft brush or cloud/mist brush to get what i want. 

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Now we are going to add some definition to the image a good one to use is Curves. You can find this where your layer menu is, at the bottom you’ll find it, ive circled what your looking for. On the third image is what will appear when you click curves, all you need to do is drag the little square and you’ll see some magic happen. So adjust it to your preference. If you want you can also mess with brightness/contrast too. ALSO i would recommend adding a person in the image, it gives you an idea of the scale your environment is.

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I was going to end it there but hey, ill show one last thing…its pretty simple. and that is some water reflection, we are going to turn the middle into water instead cause its a little boring right now. I merged all layers but the first one, you then want to make a selection and copy/paste. Free transform in the shortcut is ctrl T and do a vertical flip on it then adjust so its mirroring the top. 

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Now make a clipping mask like i explained earlier on the reflected surface and use the radiant tool…i think its called that lol it gives it more of a water surface like you see. For the image below it i used a custom brush which creates a water effect, aaaaaaaaaand bam you got you water now covering the area…easy huh. 

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And so this concludes the Tutorial and you have the end result. Hopefully that gave some tips on how to approach landscapes…they can be confusing sometimes on where to start. Enjoy and let me know if it was useful or not :P


Comprehensive (and slightly NSFW) Resource List for the Aspiring Artist V1.22

sixmilliondeadinternets:

Check out and bookmark the pseudoupdated list in the OP here! I can’t guarantee that the post you reblogged is the latest version or not. Remember to suggest something to add by dropping me a line in my /ask!

Update - Aug 30 2012: Added crap and some links suggested by kind visitors.

A.K.A. “Pato is autistic and shows off his massive collection of saved links”

Have a seat, get a cup of coffee and sit through this. Hopefully you won’t regret it. This is mostly about illustration, by the way.


FREQUENTLY ASKED BULLSHIT


  • "WHICH TABLET SHOULD I BUY?"

If you’re starting out, get the cheapest shit available. If you’re in America/Europe a Wacom Bamboowhatever apparently does the trick. If you’re anywhere else, though, get the cheaper-end Genius ones because Wacom tablets are expensive in every place that’s not the first world. Getting a $600 tablet will not make you magically improve and it’s a goddamn waste of money. There is literally no way I can stress this enough: Do not waste excessive money on expensive tablets if you don’t know how to use them!

Too poor for tablets? Start with a damn pencil.

  • "POORFAG HERE, CAN’T AFFORD PHOTOSHOP/SAI, WHAT THE FUCK DO I DO?

This is the Internet, pirate the shit out of them! Here’s a list of freeware programs you could use, because pirating is bad, mkay.

For general illustration:

  • GIMP - Non-shitty, open-source Photoshop clone; the most well-known out of the bunch, it can get a little confusing/unusuable-in-low-resolutions because of all the separated windows.
  • Paint.NET - If you are somehow too dumb for Photoshop clones here’s something easy to use.
  • Flowpaint - Even simpler.
  • Inkscape - Apparently good for things like vector art.
  • Artweaver - Get the free version which kind of sucks but otherwise decent.
  • Chibipaint - Sounds weeaboo as fuck The best thing out there for oekaki, or so they say.
  • Pixia - Made by japs for jap stuff, apparently; or maybe just a good free alternative to Photoshop that isn’t GIMP. Available in a crapload of languages, can read Photoshop files and supports most Wacom tablets natively.
  • Firealpaca - Another Nipponese piece of software, seems relatively new. I have no experience with this one whatsoever but heard good stuff about it, so have a go at it.
  • MyPaint - Open source, yet powerful enough for high-end illustrators. Seen this one used professionally, but don’t take my word for it.
  • Will add more as I find them.

For 3D modelling and such:

More links coming SOON! (Soon: Duke Nukem Forever).

  • "I’M TOO MUCH OF A FAILURE I WILL NEVER IMPROVE"

Spoilers: Improvement will take a long time, specially more if you’re self-taught. Improvement requires dedication and consistency in your learning. Don’t expect to get great if you’ve just started, and don’t expect greatness in the first year or so either. Save the shit you draw so in the future you can notice that progress has indeed been made. Again, consistency is king and so is self-improvement.

If you still think you’ll never improve just look at this and realize how wrong you are. Now, if you think you’ll instantly be as cool as that guy, look at this and realize that you still have a long way to go.

  • "I HAVE ARTIST’S BLOCK WHAT DO"

Artist’s Block is a very complicated thing but the underlying reason is either lack of creativity, acedia or (this case being the most common one) just a towering pile of bullshit. The best way to treat it is to take up theoretical drawing (anatomy studies, for example) and treat it as a chore. If you need ideas look for the Ideas Generators section below.

  • "HOW DO I APPROACH TUTORIALS?"

Tutorials are to be approached the way they are meant to be approached. Only two things are to be considered when using them, and that is do not take the author for granted and do not forget to use it as a reference instead of a fixed set of instructions. The tutorial author may not be as great as you may think, and copypasting directly will not only yield horrible results but will also kill all the vitality and creativity you may have when producing. On the other hand,feel free to take liberties when using tutorials butdo so carefully. If they are good tutorials made by knowledgeable people, they were done for a reason: skewing their advice too much leads to bad habits.


NOW, ONTO THE ACTUAL LIST THING. BUCKLE UP!


All links taken without permission but I’m sure nobody minds a bit of publicity.

BOOKS

This is actually more than enough to get you started when it comes to getting books. Saying that the amount of books here is FUCKING MASSIVE would be an understatement.

A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO GESTURE DRAWING

Simple practice method for the aimless artfag: Open any of the first two links, and choose a distinct category (For example, faces). Tell it to switch every 10 minutes if possible; else, get a timer. Fire it up and start drawing what you see. The idea is that you should stop after 10 minutes and move onto the next one, no matter how incomplete it is. Repeat until your art gets showcased in the Louvre.

COLOR THEORY AND MISCELLANEOUS COLORING FOR THE MASSES

ANATOMY AND GENERAL HUMAN BODY STUFF

PERSPECTIVE

GENERAL REFERENCES

TUMBLOGS

These are all awesome people who run awesome blogs, so you better follow all of them.

LOOSE BUNCH OF VARIOUS CRAP

GENERAL ART/DESIGN WEBSITES AND TUTORIALS

GENERAL ART/DESIGN BLOGS

ILLUSTRATION TECHNIQUES

TEXTURES, BRUSHES AND ALL THAT JAZZ

  • CG Textures - Massive collection of free textures. Also tutorials.

IDEA GENERATORS

ART COMMUNITIES

  • Conceptart.com - These guys are fucking sweet. Actually, “fucking sweet” doesn’t do enough justice - these guys are awesome. Awesome as balls.
  • DeviantArt - Well, think about it. It is an art community after all. Needless to say, the signal-to-noise ratio is ridiculous. Tread carefully and have your critic eye open.
  • /ic/ @ 4chan - Yes, I’m aware, 4chan etc. But these people are hardly what you may think they are: they will actually help your ass out and give you one of the most accurate types of criticism I’ve ever seen. Beware of slightly-more-frequent-than-usual troll activity, and try to refrain from posting your weeabooshit for everyone’s sake.
  • Creative Convention @ Somethingawful - hopeugot10buxlol

If you want me to add something, please notify me through my /ask. If you have a compilation of resources/you run a blog/etc, don’t be ashamed in whoring it out to me and tell me through /ask too. Be sure to check back often as I’ll be adding more things!



Tutorial: Expressions~

the-orator:

First off, I gotta start off with the typical Disclaimer.

*ahem*

This is a tutorial based off of MY knowledge and MY experience. My advice is just that, advice, and is not is anyway, shape or form, absolute. I am still learning and do not consider myself a professional or expert. Look at other sources, look at other materials, expand your inspiration, don’t just look at this tutorial and call it good. And most importantly have fun~

Alright, with that out of the way, before I can get to the actual expressions, we need to discuss an important concept known as “Squash and Stretch.” You’ve probably heard of it before. Squash and Stretch was a method that was invented (I use this term a bit loosely) by Freddie Moore, a Disney animator from the 1930s to 1940s. He was the animator for the Dwarves in Snow White and he gave these characters a spongy flexibility that made them feel more real and gave pliability to the face that made them come more alive.

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Even outside the world of animation, Squash and Stretch is essential and you’re going to squeeze much more life out of your characters if you understand and are willing to push the weight and flexibility of their faces. This also doesn’t only apply to cartoons, look in the mirror and make funny faces and strange expressions and you’ll notice how squishy your face is.

The next concept to be aware of is the Acting Elements of the Face. This is a concept I never really thought about until I read Tom Bancroft’s Character Mentor, a book I have recommended many times. The Acting Elements are the basics of character expression and focuses on breaking down the elements of the face in order of importance to properly communicate an expression to the audience.  These are not set in stone and a lot of times their order can be switched around depending on the expression. This is the default order Bancroft uses in his book:

1)      The eyes

2)      The eyebrows

3)      The mouth

4)      The neck

5)      The nose

I’m not going to go into much detail about this; otherwise this tutorial will run on forever, so DEFINITELY give Character Mentor a look for a better understanding.

Here are some expressions I whipped up, notice the different ways each of the above elements contributes to the overall expression. Try to identify which element is strongest in each one. Also notice how some elements repeat (such as the use of the eyebrows in the bottom two) but they’re still different expressions.

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I personally find that I always build from the eyes out when building an expression. Ever heard the phrase “The eyes are the windows to the soul?” well guess what? THE EYES ARE THE WINDOWS TO THE SOUL!  This is why people look away when their embarrassed, why their gaze shifts when they’re lying, why their eyes grow wide in awe.  It’s what makes a hero seem cold when they hold their gaze at the display of heartless behavior or gives a villain a moment of redemption when they turn away from a cruelty.

Part of the reason why Glen Keane’s characters are so incredible is the way he expresses a character through their eyes. He says “If you’re going to make a mistake, don’t make it in the eyes. Because everybody’s looking at the eyes.” He creates these characters that are filled with passion and before that passion translates into body language or into an expression, if bursts out through the eyes.

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Remember when I brought up that the order of the Acting Elements is flexible? As I said, I tend to start with the eyes when expressing and character but sometimes that just doesn’t “work” with the character. Take a look a Max, from Cats Don’t Dance (if you haven’t seen the film, I highly recommend it, even if just for the animation).  His face is almost ALWAYS in the same position, with the same expression, completely stiff. The only thing that moves is his mouth and it’s animated in a way that is both comical and intimidating! This is a common theme with his character, fluid motion against unmoving bulk.  It contrasts and guess what? Contrast creates interest! <——Remember this phrase, because it applies to everything!

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Next, pushing your expressions. Don’t be afraid to add that extra “umph” to a characters expression. Unless you’re animating, you don’t have the luxury of constant motion and steady frames, so make the most of a scene, make it clear to your audience what your character is feeling. Check out some of these simple examples below.

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Now some of you probably thought the first expression was better than the second. And you know, you may be right! Sometimes a subtler expression speaks volumes more than a more obvious one. It’s important, however, to understand to how to make the most use of your character’s face. But in the end it all boils down to the character. Which leads me to my final segment of this tutorial…

A character should express themselves through their emotions. Just like costumes, colors, body language, etc. expressions are ultimately a tool used describe a character, to visually tell a story about them.  When dealing with different characters, try to avoid “recycling” expressions, ESPECIALLY in the same scene/picture/moment. A good exercise is to draw two or three different characters with the same emotion but give them different expressions.

Or better yet, draw them reacting to the same situation.

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Your goal should be to make each expression true to the character. Their expressions should tell the audience something about them. The same way you might bold a word or phrase to emphasize its meaning, a character should express themselves in ways that emphasize who they are.


shelbyhughescreations:

Okay, so recently, I discovered that quite a few people have resorted to using the pen tool to fill in their lineart neatly, which takes EXCRUCIATINGLY long . Some people use a masking tool, others just hastily fill in the lineart with the brush tool, which usually ends up with colors poking out the side of the piece that you have to go back and erase.Well I’m going to show you a quicker, easier way to do it, using the wand tool [or selection tool in sai). Some people have problems using the wand tool, as it leaves a blank space between the lineart and the actual fill space, but this tutorial tells you how to avoid this!First, let’s start out with our lineart.Now, you’ll need to select this tool, the wand tool
Now, this is important. you need to select OUTSIDE the lines, not inside. You also have to be on the same layer as your lineart. Make sure your lines are closed so that you don’t end up selecting inside the lines! (If you have intentional gaps in your lineart, I will tell you how to use this same method later in the tutorial)NOW INVERSE!! (select -&gt; inverse) Your selection is now inside the lineart! BUT WAIT!! Do not fill behind the lineart just yet, or this will happen!
You will get white around the outside of the line! We certainly don’t want this! before you fill it in with the bucket or fill tool, you have to go to Select -&gt; Modify -&gt; Contractyou will get this, and you will will have to change the number depending on how thick your lineart is and what dpi you’re working in. Normally I just do 3 or 4 since i work in 300 dpi.So now your selection will go from this:To this!NOW you can fill/use the bucket tool underneath your lineart.Now you may have to do a little erasing in the corners, since the selection tool normally can’t get into little crevices.Also, if you select INSIDE your lineart to fill in certain areas, such as the eyes, all you have to do is go to “select -&gt; modify -&gt; expand” instead of “contract”. NOW FOR LINEART WITH INTENTIONAL GAPS. normally, if you do the selection tool, it will do this, right? 
It selects inside the lines as well. Here’s how you fix that. go underneath your lineart and make lines as if you’re connecting the lines together. Now go back to your wand tool. At the top, you will see a box that will say “Sample all layers”. You need to check this box. Now select outside your lineart and…
Viola! Now just go to the layer that you used to close the gaps, repeat all steps above, and fill it in. (if you’re using the bucket tool, you’ll have to click twice to fill it in completely)ta da! Now just do your cleanup, and you’re good to go! Don’t forget to lock your layers, as well as use clipping masks so you don’t paint outside your lines!I hope this has helped c:
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shelbyhughescreations:

Okay, so recently, I discovered that quite a few people have resorted to using the pen tool to fill in their lineart neatly, which takes EXCRUCIATINGLY long . Some people use a masking tool, others just hastily fill in the lineart with the brush tool, which usually ends up with colors poking out the side of the piece that you have to go back and erase.

Well I’m going to show you a quicker, easier way to do it, using the wand tool [or selection tool in sai). Some people have problems using the wand tool, as it leaves a blank space between the lineart and the actual fill space, but this tutorial tells you how to avoid this!

First, let’s start out with our lineart.



Now, you’ll need to select this tool, the wand tool

Now, this is important. you need to select OUTSIDE the lines, not inside. You also have to be on the same layer as your lineart. Make sure your lines are closed so that you don’t end up selecting inside the lines! (If you have intentional gaps in your lineart, I will tell you how to use this same method later in the tutorial)



NOW INVERSE!! (select -> inverse) 





Your selection is now inside the lineart! BUT WAIT!! Do not fill behind the lineart just yet, or this will happen!

You will get white around the outside of the line! We certainly don’t want this! before you fill it in with the bucket or fill tool, you have to go to Select -> Modify -> Contract



you will get this, and you will will have to change the number depending on how thick your lineart is and what dpi you’re working in. Normally I just do 3 or 4 since i work in 300 dpi.



So now your selection will go from this:



To this!



NOW you can fill/use the bucket tool underneath your lineart.



Now you may have to do a little erasing in the corners, since the selection tool normally can’t get into little crevices.

Also, if you select INSIDE your lineart to fill in certain areas, such as the eyes, all you have to do is go to “select -> modify -> expand” instead of “contract”. 

NOW FOR LINEART WITH INTENTIONAL GAPS. 

normally, if you do the selection tool, it will do this, right? 

It selects inside the lines as well. Here’s how you fix that. go underneath your lineart and make lines as if you’re connecting the lines together. 



Now go back to your wand tool. At the top, you will see a box that will say “Sample all layers”. You need to check this box. 



Now select outside your lineart and…



Viola! Now just go to the layer that you used to close the gaps, repeat all steps above, and fill it in. (if you’re using the bucket tool, you’ll have to click twice to fill it in completely)



ta da! Now just do your cleanup, and you’re good to go! Don’t forget to lock your layers, as well as use clipping masks so you don’t paint outside your lines!

I hope this has helped c:


People were requesting rebloggable Flash Inking tips

coelasquid:

Can I ask you a question about Flash? I was looking through your flash puppets, and I was wondering how you got the lines to look so NICE. Like…just looking at the linework on the hands of the bob puppet. Is there a pen setting you use? Because I can’t seem to get things to look so good.

image start with a round brush, size 3 or 4 (or 5, Windows and Mac have different brush sizes) with pressure turned on.

image 40 smoothing

Jut as a barometer of how smoothing works;

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The more smoothing you use, the more flash sort of corrects your hand wobble and tries to fix things out for you. But at really high smoothing it kind of over corrects things and starts to just invent things you didn’t want to draw. really low smoothing adds every little bump you make, but it makes INSANE huge files, because it’s got so much information to remember for every line you draw. It looks cool if you can make it work, though, we used it for that Assassin’s creed trailer because it has almost like a pen-on-paper look when it moves.

Remember that no matter how much you zoom, the pen will always be the same size. This what a size three brush (Mac version) looks like if you draw at various zoom levels, and then go back to look at it at 100%

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Because of this it’s important not to zoom in and out a lot, it’s best to pick one size and stay around that like, ink at 400, don’t zoom out more than 200 or in more than 600. When we did Ugly Americans, every scene was labeled with the zoom level everything had to be inked at, and if anything was resized it had to be retraced. It’s tempting to zoom closer and closer to get little, hard to reach details, but like they said “you can’t zoom on paper, don’t do it in Flash”.

Then there’s this Modify > Shape > Smooth option

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Basically just lets you smooth lines after the fact. A lot of people kind of give up on it because they don’t know how to use it right. Like they think it’s a magic FIX LINE ART button, then get disappointed that it doesn’t work when they select all the line art at once and say “okay smooth button GO!”.

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It works best if you get in close and just select small fragments to smooth.

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And you can kind of just polish off any little quirky bits that bug you.

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(it can be kind of hard to tell at a glance, but it adds some polish)

I’ll also add to go slow! If you draw too fast, Flash panics and starts ad-libbing your pen strokes and making weirdly geometric lines, Just take it slow if it starts freaking out on curves and stuff.